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Return of the Prairie Bandit

Their habitat once stretched across the Prairies, but when humans almost decimated the one thing they eat, the black-footed ferret disappeared. The only ferret native to North American, this mysterious animal became the most endangered species in the world. For many years, they survived only in zoos. Now a fledgling project is attempting to bring the black-footed ferret back to Saskatchewan. This dramatic story unfolds in Return of the Prairie Bandit. Shot over the course of one year, Return of the Prairie Bandit is a fascinating look at the ups and downs of this campaign set against the sweeping, stark beauty of the prairie landscape. It will be rebroadcast on the CBC News Network on Thursday Feb. 17 at 10 pm on "The Nature of Things with David Suzuki". It can also be viewed at cbc.ca/natureofthings.
Vaughan skillfully gets us emotionally involved in this true life story of survival. It took him a year to film the beginning and the outcome and it was surely worth the time and effort. Nature shows on CBC are fighting a similar struggle just to survive. Return Of The Prairie Bandit is the kind of venture fully justifying CBC's mandate. jamesbawden.blogspot.com
Return of the Prairie Bandit is a surprisingly entertaining doc. Narrated by the ever-reliable David Suzuki, Vaughan’s project isn’t just a story of eventual and cautious triumph, but a warning that despite what we may think, humans can make an indelible mark on nature if we’re not careful. Greg David, tvguide.ca
Another reason to watch: Was Hawkeye accurate when he called Frank Burns “ferret face” on M*A*S*H? You decide. Bill Harris, The Toronto Sun
Return of the Prairie Bandit is beautifully filmed – and this in itself was a challenge since the black-footed ferret is nocturnal and so much of its life is lived underground. The film’s director, Kenton Vaughan, and his team are to be congratulated on a wonderful production. It will educate and inspire and leave viewers wanting to play a part, no matter how small, in ensuring, that the black-footed ferret is with us to stay. Jane Goodall
Film Details
One Off
Format: 
HD
2011
MinutesSeconds
Run time4308
English
Spontaneous Human Productions Inc.
Credits
Director: 
Kenton Vaughan
Producer: 
Kenton Vaughan
Executive Producer: 
Kenton Vaughan
Production Manager: 
Kim Creelman
Production Manager: 
Deborah Parks
Editor: 
Greg West
Assistant Editor: 
Andrew Brose
Writer: 
Kenton Vaughan
Researcher: 
Kenton Vaughan
Cinematographer: 
Mark Caswell
Film Composer: 
David Wall
Sound: 
Grant Edmonds
Sound Recordist: 
Margus Jukkum
Sound Mixer: 
Grant Edmonds
Sound Editor: 
Grant Edmonds
Narration: 
David Suzuki
Commissioning Editor: 
Caroline Underwood, CBC Science and Nature
Awards and Festivals
Nominated for Best Nature/Environment Doc, Yorkton Short Film and Video Festival
Nominated for Best Direction (Non-Fiction), Yorkton Short Film and Video Festival
International Wildlife Film Festival, Missoula Montana
Yorkton Short Film and Video Festival
Purchase Info